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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
west. which first demanded our economy from iran. that was the first item on the docket of the newly formed united nations. the first five resolutions of the u.n. security council, beginning in january of 1946 -- three of those five involved a wrong and others. >> host: what role did the cia play in iran in the 1950s? >> well, that's a great question. i don't have any details. many iranian friends might think that i know more than i do about the operations of the cia. people will argue about this. what we do know is that in 1950 and early 1953, president eisenhower, inheriting a difficult situation from president truman, he gave the order to plan an operation inside iran, planning an operation to bring down the prime minister and to replace him with someone who believed to be worn in accordance with our interests. >> host: what was the final outcome? did the prime minister get replaced? did the shock him on the throw at that point? >> guest: it is a fascinating story. the shot was reluctant he was replaced with a military man. he did not like him very much and do not want to see a mi
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
aftershocks scenario to the u.s. economy and how will the affect the too big to fail banks and if i read this right, the rest of us. >> the after shock. >> i can speculate on what it is, the lingering depression, the slowdown in asia, and the fact that the financial system is still engaged in the incredibly risky behavior. are we talking about statements here? we will go with my theory. >> everyone is being affected by these right now and you see jpmorgan chase as a loss that was bad on your up, right? but in a way the institutions are so big that they are shielded because even with that massive trading law you see jpmorgan returning profits, so they are very respective but we have created the system where the biggar just gigantic. estimate and they know that they will be built up by the taxpayer and that creates what they call moral hazard. describe -- this is a great question because we get a bill but to much inside baseball journalism in the world all three of us. describe the problems inherent in the optional arm product and its aggressive push by wamu. >> that is a great questi
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:15am EDT
unchanged can do extraordinary things. it was the 10th largest economy. incredible. look what korean-americans have accomplished in america. north korea is the part that never got that freedom. from the first half of the 20 century is old news for everybody. but for north koreans they're still stuck in that place. i think we have a special responsibility to try to fix it. when joseph first came to the united states after a few months being in china, and we took into a grocery store, these are things you don't think about. we took the grocery store. i don't know i if you remember o this but his jaw dropped when he got to the isles. rows and rows of yoga, serial. it's amazing how much we have here. he had his first strawberries. explain what a strawberry is a watch indeed it was an amazing experience. we took him to the zoo. they had a tirerama of dinosaurs. i had so much difficult lives much difficultly dimwitted dinosaur was when there's no context. pleasant illustrations but you take that kind of level of education and isolation from the outside world across the board, everything, y
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am EDT
the economy on both sides of the debate, and felt that it wanted to try my hand at clarifying it. i felt like i needed to make my contribution as best i could, because i done that at bain capital and felt like i need to try something different and it and i had to try to do something that was important. >> host: you mentioned of bain capital. there's a lot of interesting ideas and thoughts in this book. maybe you could tell me where these ideas come from. i these ideas that are developed over a long time from your career in finance? who are your influences in how you think about the economy and what's in the book? >> guest: they probably, it evolves from debates i had with young kids that came out of top schools, came to work for first been consulted and bain capital who wanted to argue economics and politics, and i can't think when you get to be 40 or 45, and i think it evolves from that. but i also benefited greatly from a friendship i had with bruce who is a professor at columbia who i was able to make the arguments to any would frankly say you're right on this but you're stepping
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 7:00pm EDT
economy and the middle class stock in a rut. with that predicament of hours as the outcome of irresistible market forces that advance of technology and globalization and how the country like germany and others like how does a country protect its middle class and do much better on the global market than we have done? what's happened to the political middle in america why can't we find the bridge any more? where has it gone? why are we stuck in these extremes? well, let me confess to you right off the bat the american dream is not a book i set out to right. i signed a contract with random house to write a book called the treen at risk. like a lot of people understood i understood the american middle class was in deep trouble and i was interested in trying to find out what had happened, how we got here and at the same questions i just asked a moment ago. what happened is the book involved. i kept learning and it's embarrassing to say i kept learning about a per call with history in america that i covered myself in the 1970's i was in "new york times" washington bureau chief and i
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 6:45am EDT
majority country. the second is a very important one about the economy vision for the future. if you look at the islamist today there's something which is quite clear. they are all accepting the free market and the new liberal system. the first one is -- he is now making their what the e.u. didn't want him and didn't want turkey, okay, you will see. might be now that e.u. is much more in need of turkey and turkey as you see. and it's a very important point. why? because he's doing very well in the economic side. is this the answer, do we want the markets to be opened and this is why we mean by democratization? or do we want economic stability? my point is the first to go to the imf, to the world bank and into within the system because we are proud of the future. we know that islamists are not a problem with the west as long as there are new liberal us and capless. we know this. you have an example. i keep on repeating this. it was said that i was banned from the states and then was removed. but i've still been from saudi arabia for the criticism i'm making to the country which is
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
that he couldn't figure out that he needed a more on the economy if he was going to get reelected. he was willing to risk re-election for the sake of doing something perm known expand to the state, to realize more of the liberalism's goals. and so he is to that extend he is what the marxist call heightening the contradiction. he is in a certain way beg for the crisis. that's because he will be a way to daily comprise in the second term, if there is one, but i think the game he's playing is more ideological than that. and i think he would not reject the chance to put conservatively to have a real fiscal crisis in which in order fund the present promises and some of the future promises made in the welfare state or we must fundamentally trim the welfare state. and, i mean, that would be an opportunity as i say in the book to sweetennize the american economy. and so to scare move from a federal government that spends somewhere between 19 and 25% of gdp every year to one that spends 35% of gdp. that would have it seems to be a transforming effect not which i would welcome on american polit
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 12:00pm EDT
am looking at the way the economy affect our lives, where the economy gets into our very bodies. it is a book that i wrote because my body arrived in the desert under very particular circumstances in the winter of 1997 when i was broke, broken and on drugs. i was in mexico city where i had been lucky enough to go under a book contract from new york. i got an advance from a new york publishers to write a book, dream come true. in mexico city by november of 1997 i crossed the deadline and didn't have a word written and i was broke and i called the only friend i could count on at that point because my life style led me to destroy a lot of my personal relationships. i called the performance artist from coast to rico who lived in the united states for many years and a solidarity network and politics in the 1980s and i said -- of set of circumstances led her to cruise from topics of central america. everybody has a story in the desert of how they got there. ness service, 100 miles, the town of 29 homes, i saw myself driven to go further out and her friends were in the village near the edg
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 10:45pm EDT
-- paradise. but there is paul sweezy and paul sweezy was a marxist economy that taught at harvard university and an austrian economist defended having paul sweezy there at harvard to teach there and finally he gets kicked out and started his own monthly, think it was called the monthly review or something like that, a publication to defend socialism and marxism and he got albert einstein to write the very first issue. it's kind of like getting marilyn monroe to pose for the first issue of "playboy" so he was up early at man who died a few years ago hina -- kind of the representative of the marxist academic toward the. as i point out the marxists have the similar views to the austrians in one respect. both schools are very pessimistic about the future. in the case of paul sweezy, the twilight of capitalism. marxists are constantly rewriting that title that capitalism about to collapse at any time and the austrians have the same thing. the boom and the economic them that we just cannot last and it must end in a crash or depression or what have you. i'm a little bit more optimistic.
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:00am EDT
without ruling rise and making ironic comments. you totally stimulated the economy when you gave that panhandler at a dollar. even obama joked after his annual thanksgiving pardon that he saved or created four turkeys. my friends here know that i have a contrarian streak. i don't do groupthink. the guy who visited gulf after the bp spill and rode the environmental damage was being overstated, i was right. i had data. arguing that the stimulus was a new new deal was not just considered contrarian but delusional. like arguing the bp spill didn't happen. we can discuss why. a combination of relentless republican distortion, incompetent white house communication, brain dead media coverage, the unfortunate timing of the jobs bill that passed when the u.s. was hemorrhaging a hundred thousand jobs a month. the financial if quake had hit with the economic tsunami hadn't hit the tour. fortunately in 2010 i was 1,000 miles away and pretty oblivious to the prevailing stimulus narrative but i did become aware because i write about the environment that the stimulus included $90 billion for clean e
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:45am EDT
and 60s and 70s all these countries were internally focused. developing their own economies and national capacity and military. vietnam and malaysia have internal wars of rebellion and nation-building. the philippines had a rebellion in the 1950s. japan was just coming on line as a significant power in the 1970s and it was korea that developed into a significant power. all these countries have developed already and because they have developed they now have the ability to project power halt word into the. territorial soil they claim. they didn't have this capacity. we see conflict about island and geographical features below water and high tides that we never saw before. people say has everyone gone crazy? no. everyone has developed in east asia and they have military's and developed navies and air forces and conflicting conflict over geographical space. of battles over geographical space and not about ideas. there are no ideas involved. this is all about territory. this is about status, about national status. people fought in europe that nationalism was out of fashion. we are in
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 11:00pm EDT
he could not figure out how to do more on the economy but would risk the election to do something permanent to expand state and realize more of liberalism was kohl's. to that extent he is doing with the marxist call heightening the contradiction. in a certain way bidding for the crisis to come and excel rate. i thain because he will find a way to compromise and his second term. but the game he is playing in its ideological them that. he would not reject the chance to have a fiscal crisis in which you have stark alternatives. taxes must go up with the future promises made zero or we must fundamentally trim the welfare state. that is the opportunity to sweeten the economy to move from 19 or 25% of gdp every year that would have a transforming effect on the american character. >> what happens then if he is defeated? >> if is followed by conservatives. it is not impossible that romney could win to bring in the republican senate to maintain republican control of the house and confidently and expeditiously set out to replace and repeal will obamacare to undo other things done by the oba
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 3:00pm EDT
. the free economy -- the redline, stop it. but when you are allen greenspan and the fed chairman, all you have is a hammer, which is lowering interest rates and doing so with the nail. we have rates up the 2001. instead of red light listening to people, stop speculating, letting interest rates go up to tell people to do something else. instead of the lights being read, everything was green. this is a problem caused by the fed. >> thomas woods, what are some of the other topics you have written about? >> a few years ago i had a book called meltdown. it talked about what caused the financial crisis. it is pretty much the first book on the financial crisis that the bailouts. you have to understand that the whole world -- hurry up what looked like an insane lunatic on this, just give the public something other than the paul krugman explanation of what happened. again, talked about the federal reserve in this topic that is getting a lot of coverage these days. the austrian school of economics. what is this? light of their economists know that there was a financial crisis coming. were
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00am EDT
so successful. one then we all agree on the state of the economy, that the technology companies in silicon valley and seattle, increasingly in new york are the kind of envy of the world and one key reason for that i think is that the internal structure of these corporations was much more pure network way it worked. much lies hierachical, the decision making in silicon valley firm is much less about the boss at top and much more empowering local employees to make decisions on their own, to innovate on their own. they're much more egalitarian the way they share the proceed. a lot of these company have extensive stock options plans where the lowest level employee participates when the company goes public and so on. all that stuff was new, when the first silicon valley, fairchild and intel founded in '60s and early '70s. they had this ethos where they were founded by a bunch engineers. they didn't have a lot of executive perks an everyone should participate in the production of the company. that practice i think is part of why the silicon valley and tech sector has been so successful.
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 9:00am EDT
complicated, because of the economy is so complicated, the city is so complicated, trying to understand it is too hard for a small group of centrally located planners to be able to do that. no individual person has to understand the whole thing. the market works because everyone understands a little bit of it. >> host: milton friedman's pencil. >> buying and selling and creating, the totality of these agents coming up with new solutions meeting people's needs. networks are a peer market where peer progressives defer from traditional libertarians is we don't think markets solve every problem in society. there are many facets of human experience that are not necessarily solve by markets. markets create their own problems. there are a lot of companies trying to build a global network that would unite computers around the world and they all failed compared to this open source peer produce solution of the internet and the web and wikipedia and other things. there are places you can use that without it involving traditional market relations and that is what peer progressives are trying to do.
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)